Posts by Joel Payne | Jim's Trees NZ
How To Prepare & Care For Your Trees in Winter  

How To Prepare & Care For Your Trees in Winter  

When seasons change in New Zealand, farmers and homeowners have to adjust the way they care for plants, animals and trees on their property. Lower temperatures or increased precipitation can put certain species at risk of infection, breakage, or freezing. As the temperatures start to drop, the experts at Jim’s want to make sure that you are doing everything you can to protect and nourish your trees. Consult the following tips on how to prepare your trees for the upcoming autumn and winter months. With proper preparation and professional advice from New Zealand arborists, you can feel confident in the health of your farm or garden, even through freezing temperatures and snowfall. 1. Clear Fallen Fruit and Debris During Autumn, leaves will fall around the tree and create a space for pests and diseases to grow. Prevent these diseases from spreading to the tree by keeping the area around your trees clear of any litter or leaf matter that collected over the previous months. Clearing the area also allows for a healthy flow of air during the winter months. Start this process early in the autumn to prevent a long afternoon of work in the winter. 2. Apply Spray to Prevent Pests Take preventative measures to keep pests from burrowing around your trees. Sprays are available to deter pests without harming the tree. These sprays may be made out of natural ingredients. Consult a professional arborist about the best methods for preventing pests from disturbing your trees. 3. Mulch Around the Tree Although they may look almost dead during the winter months, this time of year is essential in...
What You Need to Know Before Hiring an Arborist

What You Need to Know Before Hiring an Arborist

Do you need a tree removal permit? In most tree removal cases, you can’t just immediately go ahead and remove a large oak tree from your property. For most larger tree removals you need to get a tree removal permit from your local council. There are also some trees that are exempted from this requirement. Depending on where in New Zealand your property is located, your local government may have different rules regarding tree removal regulations. However, since 2012, a new law was introduced that removed some of the bureaucratic red tape surrounding tree removal. Since then, only a distinct named list of trees and plants can’t be removed without permissions. If you’re at all unsure, we can help you determine whether you do in fact need to submit a permit before removing a tree. What is their safety and insurance policy? Arborists are involved in an inherently dangerous profession. Dealing with high-powered machinery, heights, and large trees comes with numerous safety hazards and risks. Therefore when hiring an arborist, it’s vital to ensure that they have proper health and safety protocols, as well as have a history of few critical incidents. Do they have arborist certifications? Often people are entirely unaware that tree loppers are not the same as arborists. However, it’s important to note that any individual or company calling themselves “tree loppers”, as opposed to arborists, are not sufficiently qualified to carry out the work of an arborist. They merely remove problematic branches without taking into account other factors that require significant training and expertise to judge. Within New Zealand, there are several qualifications that are...
What is the Difference between an Arborist and a Tree Lopper?

What is the Difference between an Arborist and a Tree Lopper?

When you’ve got trees that need servicing,  you want to hire someone with the right experience and skills to do the job. You not only want the pressing issue resolved immediately, but you don’t want to have to deal with the same problem again further down the road. You certainly don’t want a quick fix now to lead to a more serious problem later on. That’s why it’s important to know the different services offered, the names of professionals of various skill levels between people, and which professional is right for the job at hand. In this blog post, we will cover the difference between Tree Loppers and Professional Arborists. What is a Tree Lopper? A Tree lopper is quite simply someone who “lops” off the part of the tree that is causing an issue. Usually, tree lopping refers to making vertical cuts to trees to remove particular branches. The terminology for lopping or topping is considered fairly outdated by modern arborists. However, it’s still a term used as part of planning legislation, so it’s partially held onto for that purpose. To quote the British arboricultural association: “Lopping refers to the removal of large side branches (the making of vertical cuts) and topping refers to the removal of large portions of the crown of the tree (the making of horizontal cuts, generally through the main stems). Often used to describe crude, heavy-handed or inappropriate pruning.” Companies calling themselves tree loppers will generally have some of the tools to get a simple job done but none of the skills, training and experience to anticipate the lasting effect of the job...
The Benefits of Using Mulch for Your Garden

The Benefits of Using Mulch for Your Garden

According to Wikipedia: Mulch is “a layer of material applied to the surface of the soil. Reasons for applying mulch include conservation of soil moisture, improving fertility and health of the soil, reducing weed growth and enhancing the visual appeal of the area.” So why are Jim’s Trees arborists discussing this stuff? Well, Mulch is made out of organically occurring materials, and it turns out one of the highest quality mulches available is produced from trees and their bark. This is why when Jim’s Trees remove a tree, it endeavours not to waste this valuable material, as it can provide such incredible benefits to gardens across New Zealand. Much has some powerful benefits for modern gardens. Firstly, spreading mulch over an area increases the soil’s ability to retain water. A further benefit is that high-quality organic mulches (like mulches produced from tree felling) naturally start to decay over time; this process creates vital plant nutrients that act as natural fertilisers. This process is especially helpful for soil with poor fertility. Depending on the type of wood the mulch chippings have been made from, the mulch may even provide some protection from pests by repelling common irritants like gnats, fleas and ticks. If your garden currently has some unsightly weeds then using mulch can be an incredibly useful way of preventing those weeds from germinating and spreading throughout your garden. This will not only remove the ugly devils but also stop them from sucking moisture and other nutrients away from your beloved garden plants. Some weeds can also cause damage to gardening equipment such as lawn mowers, so reducing their...
How to Become a Qualified Arborist in New Zealand

How to Become a Qualified Arborist in New Zealand

Professional arborists are highly trained professionals who perform necessary maintenance and removals of trees in both public and private areas. Becoming a fully qualified arborist isn’t an easy feat; it’s a lengthy and challenging process. You’ll need to be someone without any fear of heights, become comfortable operating powerful machinery (such as chainsaws) and enjoy intensive physical labour. You’ll also have to spend extensive periods of time outdoors in the sun as well as other challenging weather conditions. If you’re someone who enjoys heights and working outside, then arborist may be the perfect role. Preparation for training as an Arborist Education Arborists require a sufficient level of education to be able to learn some of the intricacies of horticulture including plant and soil biology, tree species identification, and methods of pest control. Therefore, it’s imperative that prospective arborists have completed a minimum of three years of secondary education. The most useful high school subjects for those considering a career as an arborist include: horticulture, biology, math and English. Physical preparation Before any aspiring arborists begin their practice, it is extremely advantageous for them to possess some experience in the following three domains: Knowledge of horticulture and gardening experience Experience climbing and using ropes Experience working at height, such as window cleaning Working as an Arborist is often exceptionally physically demanding given the sustained periods spent climbing, lifting heavy machinery, pruning or sawing parts of trees, and other forms of manual labor. Therefore, prospective arborists need to attain a high level of physical fitness before they even initiate their training. Although their fitness will inevitably be improved by performing their...

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